Home / Exhibitions / PAST / 2015 / IAN HAMILTON FINLAY EVENING
Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY || EVENING, 1967 | A SOLEMNITY OF SUNDIALS, 1971 | Wall paintings | Unique pieces Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY

EVENING, 1967
A SOLEMNITY OF SUNDIALS, 1971
Wall paintings
Unique pieces YH 261, 1998 | with Andrew Whittle | Stone relief | 34,5 x 56 x 3 cm | Unique piece YH 261, 1998
with Andrew Whittle
Stone relief
34,5 x 56 x 3 cm
Unique piece BALLAD (Sailor), 1963 | Wall painting | Unique piece BALLAD (Sailor), 1963
Wall painting
Unique piece Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY WAVE ROCK, 1989 | with Michael Harvey and Joanna Soroka | Wall tapestry, wool | 44 x 268 cm | Unique piece WAVE ROCK, 1989
with Michael Harvey and Joanna Soroka
Wall tapestry, wool
44 x 268 cm
Unique piece Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY || LES HIRONDELLES, 1970 | Wall painting | Unique piece || SWALLOWS LITTLE MATELOTS, 1989 | with Michael Harvey | Silkscreen, framed Exhibition view IAN HAMILTON FINLAY

LES HIRONDELLES, 1970
Wall painting
Unique piece

SWALLOWS LITTLE MATELOTS, 1989
with Michael Harvey
Silkscreen, framed
IAN HAMILTON FINLAY
EVENING

19. March 2015 – 30. May 2015
Curated by Pia Maria Simig
 
 
EVENING, the title of the exhibition, is a concrete poem from 1967 and a homage to Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925-2006), the most important British exponent of concrete poetry of his time. He would have turned 90 in October this year.
 
The core of the exhibition consists of one-word and concrete poems from the 1960s with maritime theme. These are presented as hand-painted wall pieces by Les Edge.
 
In order to give his poems a new dimension, Finlay created his first poem-objects at that time. He wrote on the outer walls of his cottage, made inscriptions on stone, wood or glass and placed them into the landscape to let them communicate with it. That was also the beginning of his extraordinary garden “Little Sparta“.